Undergraduate Research Guidelines

Professors have widely varying expectations and demands of students who participate in their research. Before contacting a professor, a student should visit the professor's website to become familiar with the projects, have completed at least CIS 313, and be a major in good standing. Most professors consider it polite to get an email requesting a meeting, rather than a visit during office hours. In the email, you should include a brief mini-resume that explains your preparedness for research. In addition to these general guidelines, the list below contains statements from professors that should be considered when approaching them about research.


Dejing Dou

Artificial Intelligence, Data Mining, Data Integration, Health Informatics

If you are interested in working in the AIM Lab, please send me your resume.


Stephen Fickas

 

Students can contact me by email. If you would like a lab tour, contact my lab manager, Jason Prideaux via email (jprideau).


Anthony Hornof

Human-Computer Interaction, Cognitive Modeling, Eye Tracking and Universal Access

The best way to get started doing research with me is take (and do well in) CIS 443 User Interfaces. If you are interested, please begin as early as possible so that you have time to make a substantial contribution.


Jun Li

Computer and Network Security, Internet Protocols, and Distributed Computing

Students interested in doing research with me are welcome to contact me via email to set up an appointment to discuss the possibility.


Eugene Luks

Algebraic Algorithms, Computational Complexity, Symbolic Computation

I am not engaged in research that requires student help, but seniors wanting to get started in theoretical research are welcome to use me as a resource.


Andrzej Proskurowski

Algorithmic graph theory: Discrete Optimization Problems, Graph Classes and Width Parameters

I consider variety of algorithmic problems on graphs, sometimes related to models of communication networks. Having tutored bright high school seniors, I have respect for the inventiveness of unschooled problem solvers and recognition of their limitations. Students should make first contacts with research early to gain motivation for learning sophisticated formalisms and tools before they can contribute themselves.

Examples of the results of my working with students (undergraduate and Master's): 
B. McMahan and A. Proskurowski, Multi-source spanning trees: algorithms for minimizing source eccentricities, Discrete Applied Mathematics 137(2) pp. 213-222 (2003);
H. S. Connamacher and A. Proskurowski, The complexity of minimizing certain cost metrics for k-source spanning trees, Discrete Applied Mathematics 131(1) pp. 113-127 (2003);


Reza Rejaie

Computer Networks, P2P Networking, Multimedia Networking, Network Measurement

I am always looking for talented and hard working undergraduates who want to get involved in our research projects. The best way to get started doing research with me is take (and do well in) CIS 432 Intro. to Computer Networks. If you are interested, please begin as early as possible so that you have time to make a substantial contribution. Feel free to send me email or stop by my office.

Further information about our research projecta re available at the Mirage research group web page.

I do provide some funding for undergraduate students who make clear contributions to our projects.