Colloquium

How Quantitized Should a Digital System Be?

Abstract

Digital computers quantize voltage, current, charge and magnetic flux. Should they also quantize time? Most hardware systems quantize time by driving all parts with a rhythmic global clock. Many programming systems quantize time by doing tasks as a sequence of steps. Avoiding the step-wise thinking encouraged by quantized time may be the key to parallelism in both hardware and software. 

Distance Constrained Labeling on Graphs with Bounded Neighborhood Diversity

Abstract

We study the complexity of a group of distance-constrained graph labeling problems when parameterized by the neighborhood diversity, which is a natural graph parameter between vertex cover and clique width. Neighborhood diversity has been used to generalize and speed up FPT algorithms previously parameterized by vertex cover.

Revisit Die-stacking Architecture: Are we there yet?

Abstract

In this talk, I will first give an overview of research activities in Scalable Energy-efficient Architecture Lab (SEAL) especially on the design and architecture with emerging three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs) and emerging memory technologies such as STT-RAM, PCRAM, and ReRAM. Then I will focus on 3D die-stacking architecture, review the progress in research for die-stacking architecture,discuss the design challenges and opportunities, and finally a brief discussion on the recent die-stacking GPU architecture.

Faculty Research Topics

Abstract

This week we continue our introduction to faculty research topics. We encourage all faculty members and PhD students to attend and hope these presentations would help students meet faculty members and get exposed to the full range of the research portfolio in our department. We feature the following three speakers this week:

Presentation #1

"Research Overview for CDUX: Computing and Data Understanding at eXtreme Scale" by Associate Professor Hank Childs

Faculty Research Topics

Abstract

This week we host an introduction to faculty research topics. We encourage all faculty members and PhD students to attend and hope these presentations would help students meet faculty members and get exposed to the full range of the research portfolio in our department. We feature the following two speakers this week:

Presentation Title #1

"Topics in the Theoretical Aspect of Quantum Information and Computation" by Assistant Professor Xiaodi Wu

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